Projects and Resources

Some of our recent projects include:

 

  • North Salt Lake City Transportation Alternatives Visioning (2015)

Client: Utah Department of Transportation
Active Planning is working closely with Avenue Consultants to review a menu of potential transportation options for the I-215/Redwood Road area in North Salt Lake City, Utah.  Active Planning is primarily responsible for evaluating the impacts that potential lane alignment changes and vehicular improvements will have on mobility for cyclists and pedestrians.  Particularly the impacts that an innovative design, such as a Divergent Diamond, may have on bicycle mobility across the I-215/Redwood Road overpass.  AP is also responsible for identifying potential connectivity issues with the Legacy Highway Trail and the Jordan River Trail which meet within the study area.

  • Bicycle Corridors vs. Vehicle Lanes (2014-2015)

Client: Utah Department of Transportation
As a part of a team being led by the Department of Civil Engineering at Brigham Young University (BYU), Active Planning will be evaluating the impacts of implementing bicycle corridor treatments, such as bicycle boulevards, versus adding an additional lane for motorized vehicle travel.  This project is focused on estimating the impacts of bicycle corridors on trip generation and will ultimately provide guidelines under UDOT’s Policy on Active Transportation for evaluating locations for potential bicycle corridors.

  •  Utah Pedestrian Safety Action Plan (2015)

Client: Utah Department of Transportation, Utah Office of Highway Safety
Active Planning guided the Utah Task Force on Pedestrian Safety in creating a statewide action plan to recognize the responsibility of all road users to facilitate safe interaction. This document included a substantive description of existing conditions and pedestrian safety statistics in Utah, and an analysis of demographic characteristics for individuals involved in a pedestrian crash.  The bulk to the action plan focuses on the goals of the Task Force and objectives that will accomplish those goals.  These include policies, educational campaigns, enforcement activities as well as site specific engineering countermeasures that will work together to improve the safety of pedestrians.

  • Developing a Rubric and Best Practices for Conducting Non-Motorized Mode Counts (2014-2015)

Clients: Utah Department of Transportation, Utah Transit Authority
This project consisted of two major components.  First, Active Planning conducted a comprehensive review of methodologies, tools and technologies for conducting bicycle and pedestrian counts.  Subsequently a cross-section of sites were identified and the top technologies identified in the review were field tested to determine their usability and appropriateness for employment across Utah.  The second component of this worke will be the creation of a guidebook to assist municipalities , MPOs, interest groups and agencies in conducting bicycle counts.  The guidebook will specifically address which methods should be used for a given site and circumstance (i.e. on-road vs. off-road, trails, corridors, intersections, etc) and extends through how each method should be planned and employed, and what users can do with the data outputs once they have them.

  • Characteristics of High Risk Intersections for Pedestrians and Cyclists (Phase 3: 2014-2015) 

Client: Utah Department of Transportation
This research expanded upon the work completed in Phases 1 and 2 going beyond the geographic scope of the Wasatch Front.  Phase 3 focuses specifically on Cache, Tooele, and Washington Counties, and Moab City.   A similar rubric is employed to compile an extensive inventory of built-environment and physical site characteristics at identified “high-risk” intersections.  The measured site characteristics of high-risk intersections were then statistically correlated to site characteristics of low-risk intersections to identify specific catalysts that increase the probability of bicycle and pedestrian accidents in a given location.

  • Characteristics of High Risk Intersections for Pedestrians and Cyclists (Phase 2: 2013-2014)

Client: Utah Department of Transportation
This research built upon a preliminary Salt Lake County pilot study completed in 2012, by expanding the geographic extent to include Weber, Davis, and Utah Counties. A similar rubric was employed to compile an extensive inventory of built-environment and physical site characteristics at identified “high-risk” intersections. The measured site characteristics of high-risk intersections were then statistically correlated to site characteristics of low-risk intersections to identify specific catalysts that increase the probability of bicycle and pedestrian accidents in a given location.

  • Utah Collaborative Active Transportation Study (UCATS) (2013)

Clients: Utah Department of Transportation, Utah Transit Authority
This study employed a comprehensive approach to identify gaps in the existing bicycle and pedestrian networks across the Wasatch Front, and analyze the challenges facing people who use active transportation. Twenty-five priority projects were identified with the goal of creating a seamless multi-dimensional network of active infrastructure region wide. Active Planning was responsible for identifying significant barriers to cycling and walking over the 110 mile corridor and analyzing the health and safety impacts of top 25 prioritized projects.

**This project received the Outstanding Achievement in Plan Development Award from the American Planning Association, Utah Chapter, 2014

  • Kaysville City Bicycle and Pedestrian Needs Analysis (2012)

Client: Kaysville City, UT
Active Planning worked with Kaysville City to create a comprehensive needs analysis and recommendations for improved bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure in the city. This effort also integrated recommendations for improving Safe Routes to School maps citywide. As a part of this process, we teamed with Weber State University’s Department of Geography to help local planning students gain firsthand experience in the process of involving the public and collecting feedback.

  • Utah Household Travel Survey (2011-2012)

Clients: Wasatch Front Regional Council, Mountainland Association of Governments, Cache metropolitan Planning Organization, Five Counties Association of Governments, Utah Transit Authority, Utah Department of Transportation.
The Utah Household Travel Survey was a multi-agency effort to collect comprehensive personal and household travel data from residents across the state of Utah.  This data is currently being used to inform both long term transportation planning and modeling, as well as policy decision making.  Data collection included all travel modes (motorized and non-motorized) and all trip purposes (including recreation, long distance, air travel, etc).  Active Planning was responsible for authoring the bicycle and pedestrian components of the household travel survey, providing methodological oversight on data collection, managing external bicycle and pedestrian data collection (intercept surveys and counts), and collecting data on long distance and recreation travel.

  • Identifying a Profile for Non-Traditional Cycle Commuters (2011-2012)

Client: Utah Department of Transportation
This research analysis sought to identify key characteristics of and create a profile for non-traditional commuter cyclists.  The project also involved identifying latent demand for cycle commuting, demographic characteristics of these commuter cyclists, as well as identifying typical origins and destinations and current and preferred routes for cycling trips across the Salt Lake Valley.

  • Characteristics of High Risk Intersections for Pedestrians and Cyclists (Phase 1: 2011-2012)

Client: Utah Department of Transportation
This research involved compiling an extensive inventory of built-environment and physical site characteristics at identified “high-risk” intersections (those that exhibit high numbers of bicycle and pedestrian crashes).  The measured site characteristics of high-risk intersections were then statistically correlated to site characteristics of low-risk intersections to identify specific catalysts that increase the probability of bicycle and pedestrian accidents in a given location.

**This project was recognized by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Standing Committee on Research (SCOR) and its Research Advisory Council (RAC) as one of the top 16 projects nationwide in 2013 and received the Transportation Excellence through Research Award.

  • Utah Bicycle and Pedestrian Master Plan Design Guide (2010-2011)

Client: Utah Department of Health
This project involved the creation of a guidebook to assist municipalities and other agencies/users in the creation of a bicycle and pedestrian master plan.  The guidebook addresses the unique situations faced by individual jurisdictions and provides a variety of options within a consistent framework.  Active Planning managed project, conducted public involvement and organized technical feedback, authored guidebook chapters, and managed the dissemination plan. It is anticipated that in the coming year Active Planning will assist UDOH in providing technical trainings for local practitioners and public officials.

**This project received the U.S. Institute of Transportation Engineers, Pedestrian and Bicycle Council’s Best Project Award, 2012.  The plan also received the Outstanding Achievement in Plan Development Award from the American Planning Association, Utah Chapter, 2012.

  • HUD Sustainable Communities Planning Grant (2010)

Clients: Salt Lake County, Salt Lake City, Wasatch Front Regional Council, Utah Department of Transportation, Utah Transit Authority, University of Utah, Envision Utah, and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (Utah office).
Active planning was a key player in organizing the stakeholder consortium and creating the vision for the grant application.  We authored a large portion of the grant proposal including the approach and implementation sections, as well as providing guidance on structure and organizational capacity.  This grant was one of only 2 nationwide to be awarded a perfect score and receive full-funding of $5 million over 3 years.